Tag Archives: writing

RONE Awards: Vote for The Beltane Escape

 

The Beltane Escape has been nominated for a RONE Award for excellence in

YA Paranormal/Fantasy/Sci-Fi!

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Reader voting begins today, May 22 – until May 28.

To vote:
1. Go to http://www.indtale.com/2017-rone-awards-week-six
2. Follow the instructions to vote, follow (“Click to register)
3. Click the verification link sent to you via email. If you do not verify that you registered, you will be unable to vote.
4. Return to www.indtale.com.
You will find The Beltane Escape under the YA Paranormal/Fantasy/Sci-Fi category.

All votes will be greatly appreciated!

Coming Soon!

  • The relaunch of The Teen Wytche Saga will begin in June with new covers, new content, and new stories.
  • The Amber Elixir, a Two Realms novella featuring the Lady of the Lake, Merlin, and Morgan le Fay will soon be available for preorder.
  • The Viking Mist, Book 2, The Two Realms Trilogy, is in the final stages of editing!

 

 

Great Opportunity For Aspiring Authors

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Why should you enter a writing contest?

  1. To gain valuable feedback.
  2. To gain access to acquiring editors and agents.
  3. To improve your craft.

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Toronto Romance Writers is accepting entries from unpublished writers for The Catherine 2017* from December 1, 2016 to January 31, 2017. Permission to forward is granted and encouraged!

Grand Prize

The Gold Ticket Round winner and runner-up will receive a three-month mentorship with a published author.

Mentors:  Molly O’Keefe and Eve Silver

Judge:  Kristin Nelson, Nelson Literary Agency

Finalist Round

The top three entries in each category from the preliminary round will advance to the Finalist Round. Each entry in the Finalist Round will be judged by one acquiring agent and one editor.

Each first place winner in their category will receive a critique by a published author prior to advancing to the Gold Ticket Round.

CONTEMPORARY

Agent:  Shira Hoffman, McIntosh & Otis

Editor:  Deb Werksman, Sourcebooks

Published Author:  Stefanie London

CONTEMPORARY:  SHORT

Agent:  Jill Marsal, Marsal Lyon Literary Agency

Editor:  Piya Campana, Harlequin

Published Author:  Mary Sullivan

EROTIC ROMANCE

Agent:  Courtney Miller-Callihan, Handspun Literary

Editor:  Brenda Chin, Entangled Publishing

Published Author:  Christine d’Abo

HISTORICAL

Agent:  Laura Bradford, Bradford Literary Agency

Editor:  Jennie Conway, St. Martin’s Press,

Published Author:  Ann Lethbridge

MAINSTREAM WITH STRONG ROMANTIC ELEMENTS

Agent:  Janna Bonikowski, The Knight Agency

Editor:  Allison Carroll, Harlequin, Graydon House Books

Published Author:  Kate James

PARANORMAL, FANTASY, FUTURISTIC

Agent:  Jim McCarthy, Dystel, Goderich & Bourett LLC

Editor:  Angela James, Carina Press

Published Author:  Morgan Rhodes

ROMANTIC SUSPENSE

Agent:  Stacy Donaghy, Donaghy Literary Group

Editor:  Elizabeth May, Kensington Publishing

Published Author:  Kelley Armstrong

YOUNG ADULT

Agent:  Vanessa Robins, The Corvisiero Literary Agency

Editor:  Annie Berger, Sourcebooks

Published Author:  Juliana Stone

 

Preliminary Round 

Each entry will receive guaranteed feedback.

Judges: Toronto Romance Writers’ members.

*For the complete rules and regulations, please visit torontoromancewriters.com

Choosing the Best Point of View

Today’s guest post by Brigid Amos on Point of View (POV) brought to mind my own evolution as a writer. Mastering POV was vital to my becoming published. To conquer my head hopping habit, I forced myself to write an entire book, Spell Check, from a single point of view. My writing improved dramatically, and Spell Check became my first published novel. Spell Struck, the second book in my Young Adult Teen Wytche Saga, required alternating points of view. As Brigid explains, there is a way to successfully achieve this. My sixth book, the upcoming sequel to The Beltane Escape has been a challenge. Four points of view! Watch for more details on The Viking Mist.

Now please welcome Brigid Amos, author of the newly released A Fence Around Her, a Young Adult Historical novel.

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One of the biggest decisions a writer makes when she begins a new story is choosing a point of view (POV). There are many ways to define POV, but I like to think of it as the means by which the writer guides the reader through the story and what she allows the reader to see, hear, and know. It is as if the reader arrives at a theater to watch a performance, and the writer is the usher who shows the reader to his seat. But the seat isn’t necessarily in the audience. Sometimes, it’s inside the head of one of the characters, sometimes, it is even inside the writer’s head. Where the reader sits will completely affect how he experiences the story. The usher can move the reader around during the performance, but must do so in such a way that he does not get confused and lose track of the story.

When I first started writing, I gravitated toward an omniscient point of view, or so I thought. I wanted to tell the reader what everyone was thinking and feeling, as if I were a camera floating about a scene, but one that could also dive in and out of characters’ heads at will and somehow record their thoughts. I think this tendency to the omniscient POV is very common among beginning writers. For me, it was probably an effect of being steeped in classic literature. But the problem was that I was not writing in a true omniscient POV. Instead, I was “head hopping,” that is, changing POV from one character to another and completely confusing the reader. I learned early on that if I were going to write in third person, I had to stick to one character for an entire chapter or at least an entire section. In this way, I could write in a close third person POV without getting into too much literary mischief.

When I started writing A Fence Around Her, I so strongly identified with my protagonist Ruthie Conoboy, that I naturally switched my usual close third person POV to first person POV. Ruthie tells her story directly to the reader, and when the reader comes to my theater, I seat her right there in Ruthie’s head so that she can look through Ruthie’s eyes and hear with Ruthie’s ears. When I was writing, I felt that I was Ruthie writing the story as if in a journal or diary. People always ask me if I journal. When I was studying for my Master’s degree years ago, I bought myself one of those cute little fabric covered blank books and dutifully filled the pages every day. Then I stopped, because frankly, journaling wasn’t as fun for me as it is for others. The strange thing is that when I write in first person, it feels as if I am journaling, but I’m doing it in character. And when I’m journaling from the point of view of one of my characters, it is most certainly fun!

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Can a girl break free from her mother’s past?

About the book:

Having a mother with a past is never easy. For Ruthie Conoboy it becomes the struggle of a lifetime in 1900, the year Tobias Mortlock arrives in the gold mining town of Bodie, California. Ruthie is suspicious of this stranger, but her trusting father gives him a job in the stamp mill. Soon, Ruthie suspects that her mother and Mortlock have become more than friends. Can Ruthie stop this man from destroying her family?

Having a mother with a past is never easy. For Ruthie Conoboy it becomes the struggle of a lifetime in 1900, the year Tobias Mortlock arrives in the gold mining town of Bodie, California. Ruthie is suspicious of this stranger, but her trusting father gives him a job in the stamp mill. Soon, Ruthie suspects that her mother and Mortlock have become more than friends. Can Ruthie stop this man from destroying her family?

To read and excerpt and more, please visit Ariella Moon Blogspot.

A Fence Around Her is available on 

Amazon:  getBook.at/AFenceAroundHer

iTunes:   https://itun.es/us/qzAQeb.l

Kobo  Smashwords

About Brigid Amos:

Brigid Amos’ young adult historical fiction has appeared in The MacGuffin, The Storyteller, Wilderness House Literary Review, and Words of Wisdom. A produced playwright, she co-founded the Angels Playwriting Collective and serves on the board of the Angels Theatre Company. She is also an active member of Women Writing the West and the Nebraska Writers Guild. Although Brigid left a nugget of her heart behind in the California Gold Country, most of it is in Lincoln, Nebraska where she currently lives with her husband.

Connecting with Brigid:

Join Brigid’s mailing list: http://www.brigidamos.com/mailing-list-signup.html

Like Brigid on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/brigidamoswriter/?fref=ts

Follow Brigid on Twitter: https://twitter.com/Brigid_Amos

Visit Brigid’s website:       http://www.brigidamos.com/

 

 

Writing Contest News!

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The Heart-to-Heart Contest for aspiring romance writers returns! The top three entries in each category will be judged by an agent and two editors.

This is a great contest for receiving valuable feedback. I look forward to once again, being a first round judge.

For details on how to enter, click here.

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Meet Me at B-Fest!

For book lovers in the Coachella Valley, please join me at 10:00 AM on Saturday, June 11, 2016 at Barnes and Noble in the Westfield Mall, Palm Desert. I will be signing The Beltane Escape and Spell Check, and giving away magical swag while supplies last.

Ariella Moon Book Signing

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Do you think the Desert Writers Expo organizers know about my sugar addiction? Is that why my table for the March 11, 2015 book sale and signing is as far from the refreshments (and entrance) as humanly possible?

I’ll be selling and signing copies of Spell Check, Book 1, The Teen Wytche Saga. (Winner of the Zola Award) Perhaps there was some unease about having a shaman in the house. As the characters in Spell Check know, sometimes magic goes awry. Not that I’d cast hex hives on anyone…

If you are in the desert, (mid-80s!), stop by the Rancho Mirage Public Library and make your way back to the stage area. I’ll have swag, emergency brownies, and of course, copies of Spell Check. I’ll be happy to answer questions about writing, publishing, and magic.

Spell Check New Cover

~Ariella Moon

Which Class of Author Are You?

Literary agent, author, and speaker Donald Maas has much to say in his thought-provoking article about the literary class system. Anyone in publishing or trying to break into publishing, is acutely aware of the hierarchy, but few have defined it so well.

What separates a “First Class” author from the rest? Are there opportunities for upward mobility? Donald Mass answers these questions and more at:                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                         

http://writerunboxed.com/2014/02/05/the-new-class-system/ 

For the chance to win an e-book from the Teen Wytche Saga, join the Romance is in the Air Giveaway at http://www.ariellamoon.blogspot.com

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Will Work For Chocolate

The Writer’s Block

Since submitting my manuscript for Book 3 of the Teen Wytche Saga, I’ve been reworking the first manuscript in my upcoming Middle Grade series. For two nights I have been blocked on a particular chapter – one I knew needed a lot of rewriting to crank up the tension. I woke today determined to tackle the beastly block.

Phase One: Procrastinate

Writers have to eat, right? And since the temperature was supposed to hit the 112 degree mark today, that meant grocery shopping had to be moved to the top of my To Do list. Once I had found a parking spot in the shade (score!) I reasoned, The bakery is just across the street. Why not buy my bread there?

Unwilling to relinquish a shady parking spot, I donned my hat, waded through the heat waves rising off the asphalt, and finally reached the six-lanes in all directions intersection that stood between me and a loaf of honey oat multi-grained bread. The metal signal button burned my finger. The automated recording yelled, “Wait. Wait. Wait. Wait.” My blood pressure maxed. Finally the automated voice switched to “Walk sign is on. Walk sign is on.” Holding the brim of my hat, I speed walked to the far side as the voice counted down to one.

The Mirage

Aspen Mills Bakery and Deli makes some of the finest brownies on earth. So I really couldn’t just buy a loaf of bread, right? I knew you’d agree.

Purchases in hand, I hiked back to the intersection. When I first glanced up, I saw a motorcycle cop standing next to his bike in the middle of the intersection, his hands raised in a stop position. A quick sweep of the traffic revealed no accident. The traffic lights must be out. I looked back at the cop. He had vanished. I blinked.

I’m a shaman as well as an author. Yes, it was noon, I was hungry, and it was hotter than Hades. Any non-magical person would assume her eyes were playing tricks on her. But shamans can’t ignore visions. So I did a quick stop at the supermarket, then headed home, avoiding the intersection with the phantom cop.

Raising the Stakes: The Bargain

A bargain with yourself is easily broken (Who besides your dog and the gods would know?), so I went on Facebook and posted today’s house rule: No chocolate until I deal with the centaurs.

An earlier post had mentioned I was happily back writing about fairies, Vikings, and other magical creatures, so when I said centaurs, readers knew I referred to my Middle Grade trilogy. Those who know me, are well aware of my chocolate addiction. The stakes were high. The pressure huge.

Will Work For Chocolate

I kept the brownie in its little brown bag, stashed it in the pantry, ate lunch, and ignored the little dessert as it you hoo-ed from the cupboard. Back in front of the computer, I groaned as the word “brownie” kept appearing in the chapter (one of the main characters is a British brownie, a little man/ house elf) but I remained tough. Image

What I Learned 

I can be hyper-focused and amazingly productive when chocolate is at stake. I drew upon reserves I didn’t know I had, and powered through until I had wrestled those centaurs to the ground. I wielded the Delete button like a sword, excising text that slowed the action, and cutting a faulty subplot. Sure, I still have to hunt down the thread to the subplot and do some rewriting. But I kept my word. I dealt with the centaurs.

Now if you will excuse me, there is a brownie calling my name. And I have to figure out the shamanic meaning behind the phantom cop. I suspect he symbolized, Stop procrastinating and finish your rewrites!